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Keynote to take place at the Cassandra Voss Center with later sessions split between there and the Mulva Library.
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Tuesday, June 7
 

8:45am

Keynote - Bonnie Stewart & Dave Cormier

Discussion of the rise of the digital in higher education is often framed by debate, factionalism, and deeply-held concerns. Scholars align behind the validity of one set of tools or another, or position digital practices as opposed to authentic teaching and scholarship. Digital education itself - whether via LMS platforms or open offerings like MOOCs - has often reinforced these binary perceptions by centering extensively on content delivery, giving teachers the impression their expertise is under threat from green screen video lectures.


Yet education is never as much about what we teach as how. This talk explores the ways in which digital technologies open up that “how” of teaching and learning to enable new structures and forms for communications. Digital tools, concepts, and practices open up the walls of classrooms and of scholarship, and thus have far more significant - and hopeful, if complex - implications for academia than content-based debates allow us to grapple with. This presentation will outline ways in which digital networks fundamentally challenge traditional narratives surrounding higher education, and frame possibilities that arise when we think of education in terms of connection rather than content. It will examine what it means to succeed as learners, scholars, and institutions in a time of knowledge abundance, and open up ideas for ways forward.


Tuesday June 7, 2016 8:45am - 10:15am
Cassandra Voss Center - Main Floor

10:30am

Online Competency Curriculum Update
Give an update on the project. I hope to have some faculty members who are a part of it to join and answer any questions.

Speakers
avatar for Sundi Richard

Sundi Richard

Instructional Designer, St. Norbert College


Tuesday June 7, 2016 10:30am - 11:00am
Mulva Library - 314

10:30am

Who are they? Recent findings about student identities in online discussions
How do students develop identities within online discussions, and why should you care? Join in an engaging conversation regarding recent findings regarding undergraduate students’ perceptions of online discussions within a wide variety of courses. Students approaching graduation were interviewed and transcripts from their online discussions were analyzed. Findings indicate a variety of factors that influence how the participants developed their social identities using elements of social presence and facework. Based on the results of this study, suggestions for instructors and instructional designers will be provided. Ample time will be allowed for discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly M. Harrison, PhD

Kimberly M. Harrison, PhD

School for Professional Studies, Elmhurst College, School for Professional Studies, Elmhurst College
Hi! I am the Director of Instructional Support and Online Operations for the School of Professional Studies at Elmhurst College. I previously worked at Elmhurst College as a Curriculum Developer and have over 15 years of experience in education / teaching, from preschool kids through college students through training adults. I have an MA in sociology and just received my PhD in Instructional Technology in May 2016. My research interests... Read More →



Tuesday June 7, 2016 10:30am - 11:20am
Cassandra Voss Center - Basement

10:30am

Flipping My Calculus Classes
In the Fall of 2013, I offered my first-semester calculus class as a “flipped” course. Outside the classroom, lectures were given narrated slide presentations, available in PowerPoint and HTML5 formats. The bulk of in-class time was spent on small teams of students working on problems. This approach succeeded well enough that I flipped my second-semester calculus class the following spring, and I’ve continued this approach ever since. I will share the mechanics of what was done, my impressions of what worked and what didn’t, and student feedback.

Speakers

Tuesday June 7, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am
Mulva Library - 315

10:30am

Scoring the Digital Landscape (Virtual)
This presentation is guided by the instructor’s experiences with a new course emphasizing several learning objectives: development of skills in MIDI programming, audio editing and processing, arranging, scoring to picture, implementation of audio for interactive applications, audio asset management, mastering, and mix automation. The learning outcome: a playable game build with its own dynamic soundtrack and fully realized cinematic. Such a course could be created and developed independently or in partnership with a digital cinema, art, gaming, or computer science department; taught to students or to groups of students (i.e. development teams), and perhaps as part of a music industry or collaborative arts program. This course, along with other newly developed courses, could enable composers and sound designers to develop a video game package in cooperation with students who may already be programming and creating art for games.

Speakers
avatar for Gerhard Guter

Gerhard Guter

Assistant Professor of Music Business & Jazz Studies, Elmhurst College
Gerhard Guter is a composer, arranger, producer, and multi-instrumentalist. He has written and produced music for The History Channel, World of Warcraft, Celebrity Cruises, and Microsoft. Guter’s orchestral music has also been featured at the Orpheum Theater for the Ovation Awards in Los Angeles. As a vocalist, he is a member of the vocal jazz quintet Vocalogy, which has released two albums to date. | | A certified Avid Pro Tools HD and... Read More →


Tuesday June 7, 2016 10:30am - 11:30am
Cassandra Voss Center - Main Floor

12:30pm

Networking Through Conversation: Using Community to Overcome Barriers to Connection
This session is not a presentation, workshop, or artistic expression. This session is a conversation. A conversation about conversations and their power to connect people despite barriers of time, space, and resources. Participants will be invited to join the conversation to reflect on the power of community and networks.

Speakers
avatar for Maha Bali

Maha Bali

Associate Professor of Practice, The American University in Cairo
I'm a MOOCaholic and writeaholic, passionate about open, connected learning. Co-founder of virtuallyconnecting.org (join us during #dlrn) and edcontexts.org) write for us!) and columnist/editor at Hybrid Pedagogy (you probably already know us)
avatar for Autumm Caines

Autumm Caines

Associate Director of Academic Technology, Capital University
Autumm Caines is a liminal space. Part technologist, part artist, part manager, part synthesizer she is passionate about the use of technology in education and the many differing facets of how technology impacts society and culture, she likes spending time at the place where differing disciplines intersect. | | She is the Associate Director of Academic Technology in the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Capital University... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Hammerschaimb

Lisa Hammerschaimb

Doctoral Student, Athabasca University
Lisa Hammershaimb is an educator and graphic designer committed to creating online spaces that nurture creativity. Because Lisa believes each person has a unique voice and vision, she works to create structures that promote connection, enable access, and ultimately affirm all students as valuable members of a living community. | | Currently pursuing her EdD in Distance Education from Athabasca University, Lisa is researching the ways graphic... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Hogue

Rebecca Hogue

PhD Candidate, University of Ottawa
I’m Rebecca J Hogue (@rjhogue). I’m a blogger (http://rjh.goingeast.ca, http://bcbecky.com, and http://goingeast.ca), a scholar, an educator, and aspiring writer. I'm a PhD Candidate at the University of Ottawa and an Associate Lecturer at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. I teach Emerging Technologies and Instructional Design online. My research and innovation interests are in the development of health literacy through peer-to-peer... Read More →


Tuesday June 7, 2016 12:30pm - 1:20pm
Cassandra Voss Center - Main Floor

12:30pm

Situating Your Teaching Within a Full Spectrum Landscape
St. Norbert College adopted a "full spectrum pedagogy" model to articulate the value of effective teaching practices using a range of levels of technology integration across the breadth of the college. The framework helps professors to intentionally situate their practice within the spectrum and consider the implications for teaching and learning. One variable worth evaluating is the match between the pedagogy and the teaching "space." We will share our framework and discuss efforts to create match between pedagogy and teaching/learning spaces.

Speakers


Tuesday June 7, 2016 12:30pm - 1:20pm
Mulva Library - 315

12:30pm

Teaching With Google+ Communities
Traditional Learning Management Systems do a good job of coordinating assignments and providing a grading framework, but they are not so successful at fostering an atmosphere of community and collaboration. The facilities of Google Apps do a much better job of this, especially when a Google+ Community sits in the center as the primary communication within the class.

Speakers
avatar for Dave Basener

Dave Basener

Instructional Technologist, Elmhurst College
I love to teach. First I love to teach Philosophy, second, I love to teach Astronomy. If I can't do those, I will teach technology.


Tuesday June 7, 2016 12:30pm - 1:20pm
Mulva Library - 304

12:30pm

Teaching with Zotero: Using Citation Management Tools to Encourage Conversations about Research & Crowd Sourcing Research
New citation management tools, like Zotero and Mendelely, help students collect, organize, and cite sources they intend to use in independent research projects. They can also be used as pedagogical tools that facilitate collaborative research, peer-assessment of information-seeking habits, and conversations about the value of scholarship. This session will introduce instructors to features common to most citation management tools that can be used to scaffold assignments and design activities that bolster students’ research abilities.

&

Looking at different ways to crowdsource research. 


Tuesday June 7, 2016 12:30pm - 1:20pm
Mulva Library - 314

12:30pm

Using technology to flip the classroom and enhance student learning: three different models in the Natural Sciences
Rearranging the timing of content attainment by the student is a common feature of a flipped classroom. However, there are likely as many modes of flipping the classroom as there are instructors. Each of us shared the common goal of engaging students, but other unique learning outcomes motivated our flip and resulted in three very different approaches. We will present three distinct approaches to a flipped classroom (panel format) and discuss the impact on student learning based on preliminary assessment results.


Tuesday June 7, 2016 12:30pm - 1:20pm
Cassandra Voss Center - Basement

1:30pm

Authoring Moodle quizzes more easily + Grading with Moodle Rubrics
Among the features of Moodle learning management systems (such as SNoodle at SNC) are automatically graded online systems. Once written and implemented, these quizzes provide assessment and feedback for students without demanding further time from the instructor. Actually writing these quizzes in the online web editor can be quite tedious, frustrating, and error-prone, however. I will discuss a new software package that makes creating, editing, and managing these quizzes much easier.

&

In this presentation, I will describe my use of Moodle rubrics in grading laboratory and research project assignments in an undergraduate health psychology course. In addition to demonstrating various features and potential applications of Moodle rubrics, I will discuss some "lessons learned" and "likes and dislikes" regarding my use this tool. 


Tuesday June 7, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Mulva Library - 304

1:30pm

Paying it Forward: Introducing Faculty to New Technologies to Increase Student Engagement (Virtual)
Introducing faculty to new engaging, classroom appropriate technologies enables them to integrate these online pedagogical principles in their own courses. When done properly, this results in engaged students who participate in active learning. Those in the faculty development field have the opportunity to assist faculty in achieving these goals as they then pay it forward in best serving our students.

Speakers

Tuesday June 7, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Cassandra Voss Center - Main Floor

1:30pm

Reviving the Fiction Factory: Editing a Penny Dreadful as an Undergraduate Research Project & Replacing the Essay: Introducing Digital Project Suites in the Undergraduate English Classroom
Frankenstein, Dracula, and "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" are all staples of the college curriculum, but one enduring nineteenth-century horror story is rarely taught or read in its original form: James Malcolm Rymer's "penny blood" The String of Pearls, or the Barber of Fleet Street--the source of the legend of Sweeney Todd. There is currently no complete scholarly edition of the 1850 complete version of this 734-page illustrated serial. That lack is currently being rectified by an enterprising group of undergraduate students in majors ranging from English, History, and Drama to Chemistry. We are collectively transcribing, encoding, and annotating this work as a documentary digital edition, which conforms to the TEI guidelines and features a student-designed and produced graphical user interface (GUI). Pedagogically, the 'Sweeney Todd' project builds research, teamwork, and problem-solving skills, and gives some students experience in project and team management. As for myself, I'm learning from my students not only how to crowdsource a digital edition, but how to review and reflect upon my teaching and research methods, and how to network effectively in a community full of potential, curiosity, and creativity--the undergraduate population at my own institution.

&

This talk will describe how I rebuilt my undergraduate literature classrooms around the concept of digital project suites. The goal was not simply to displace the over-determined centrality of the "essay," but also to enhance and extend collaboration; to introduce and evaluate digital tools; to emphasize writing in new media formats; and ultimately to, via these experiences, begin approaching and interpreting literature in new and different ways. 


Tuesday June 7, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Mulva Library - 314

1:30pm

Thus Tweets Academia
A panel discussion centered around the various uses of Twitter in academia.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Tom Bolin

Tom Bolin

Professor, Theology & Religious Studies, St. Norbert College


Tuesday June 7, 2016 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Cassandra Voss Center - Basement

2:30pm

Computers and Clothing: Teaching The History of Clothing and Fashion as an Online Course
This seminar will discuss the obstacles and solutions for teaching The History of Clothing and Fashion as a three-week, entirely online course. I will be covering the use of Wordpress as a method for creating a "photo morgue", the use of the program Camtasia to record and edit the lectures, and the ways to engage the students in the study of what is essentially a tactile art.

Speakers

Tuesday June 7, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Cassandra Voss Center - Basement

2:30pm

Developing a Sensor-Based Electronics Course With Arduinos
The traditional electronics course administered to undergraduate physics majors is typically broken into three major topics: basic DC and AC circuits, non-linear devices (diodes, transistors, op-amps), and basic digital (TTL, ECL) circuits. While each of these topics maintains some degree of applicability, many laboratories have recently turned to using small, modular processors (Arduinos and Raspberry-pi's) to monitor and control a wide variety of physical sensors. This presentation reports on an advanced laboratory immersion at the Miami University of Ohio in which Arduinos are used in a variety of undergraduate laboratory experiments. Strategies for modernizing the electronics course at St. Norbert College to incorporate sensor-based projects using Arduinos will also be presented.

Speakers

Tuesday June 7, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Mulva Library - 315

2:30pm

Putting Slave Narratives on the Map & Student Campus Mapping Projects Using ARCGIS Online
Digital mapping pushes students to analyze historical and literary sources for concrete information regarding time and place. Slave narratives can be read as both historical documents and as literature, and students who use these narratives to create digital maps use this technology to tell a story about the realities of chattel slavery in antebellum America.

&

A showcase of several SNC focused online mapping projects. 

Speakers

Tuesday June 7, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Mulva Library - 304

2:30pm

Teaching with Open-Access Resources: Institutional Repositories, Digital Archives, and Research Impact.
This session will highlight strategies for integrating open-access content and other digital resources into courses designed to enhance students’ research skills. Participants will learn about open-access sources, archival materials, and other tools that can enhance students’ ability to produce and disseminate their own research projects. They will also gain familiarity with online tools that can help students track the impact of their own research and evaluate the importance and relevancy of content produced by other researchers.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Titus

Sarah Titus

Project Librarian for Intellectual Engagement Initiatives, St. Norbert College


Tuesday June 7, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Mulva Library - 314

2:30pm

Virtually Connecting

This session will open the collective conversation that we are having at the T3 conference to virtual participants from around the world that could not make it to De Pere.


Speakers
avatar for Autumm Caines

Autumm Caines

Associate Director of Academic Technology, Capital University
Autumm Caines is a liminal space. Part technologist, part artist, part manager, part synthesizer she is passionate about the use of technology in education and the many differing facets of how technology impacts society and culture, she likes spending time at the place where differing disciplines intersect. | | She is the Associate Director of Academic Technology in the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching at Capital University... Read More →


Tuesday June 7, 2016 2:30pm - 3:20pm
Cassandra Voss Center - Main Floor

3:30pm

Closing Reception
Join other conference attendees to reflect on the day and chat about whatever you feel up for.

Relax for a while before heading back to your regular routines. 

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Lynds

Daniel Lynds

Instructional Technologist, St Norbert College
Daniel Lynds is an Instructional Technologist at St. Norbert College in the Digital Humanities. With a Bachelor of Fine Art and a Masters in Education Technology, Daniel collaborates with people on making their work as impactful and open as possible. His work centers around digital storytelling, social network analysis, open education, and cultural theory. As an editor at Hybrid Pedagogy, a critical journal/community/conversation/study, Daniel... Read More →


Tuesday June 7, 2016 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Mulva Library - 301